Prayer for Unfaithful Women, 2005

There are many stories about unfaithful women. For instance in my hometown in France, during Middle Age, unfaithful women were put into cage and submerged into the river. If the woman was still alive after 10 minutes it meant that she was faithful.

The Prayer For Unfaithful Women is a Performance Art about women who consorted with German soldiers during World War II. They were humiliated and had their head shaved in public on the main square. This Art Performance is a visual denunciation of the rage under the guise of an angelic prayer. It is about French Memory, we carry with us from our History

Andree Weschler

One week performance

Art and War Fringe Festival 2005 Esplanade, Singapore

The Map of Love, 2011

La Carte de Tendre was a French map of an imaginary land called Tendre produced in the 17th Century, which depicts the "geography of love" according to the Precieuses  of that era: the River of Inclination flows past the villages of "Billet Doux" (Love Letter), "Petits Soins" (Little Trinkets), and intrepid travelers brave the dangers of "Le Lac d' Indiference" (Lake of Indifference). The villages, roads, and topographic features in this allegorical representation trace the myriad facets of love and its associated perils. 

Lynn Lu and Andrée Weschler revisited the map of love with its successes and pitfalls and propose a new reading of the Carte of Tendre with video installation and performances art.

Ref. Carte de Tendre, 17th Century print, Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale de France

Drawn by Melle de Scudery

Engraved by François Chauveau

  

Domesticated in her Animality, 2000

“The video lasts 45 minutes. I look in the video camera as if it is a mirror. The video camera becomes a conduit from the private space to the public place.
I pluck my eyebrows, one hair after the other, one by one. At first the process is constructive, the eyes get bigger, the face prettier. But the process does not stop and suddenly removing hair one by one becomes destructive. 
A simple act of everyday becomes definitive.”

Andrée Weschler, 2002